Asset Managers Are from Mars, Investors Are from Venus (Part 2 – A Space-Walk Down to Earth)

In the first part of this post, I wrote about how differently asset managers and investors react to stressfull situations, with the retreat to the cave of the ones contrasting with the need for increased communication and transparency of the others. Continue reading

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Aim Well Before Shooting for the (Private Equity) Stars

If you are shooting for the stars it may be wise to look for some reference points to be sure you are aiming in the right direction. Careful navigators always check the Pointers to confirm they have correctly identified the Southern Cross before marking the route. Continue reading

Hey Hey My My, Private Equity Can Never Die

One of the likely most memorable achievements of David Rubenstein will be not about private equity, in the strict sense – it will be the rap he sang in the Carlyle’s 2014 Holiday message to investors. Musical license for musical license, he might as well have come up with a rock song to introduce his recent predictions about the evolution private equity industry. Neil Young would forgive that it is me instead to “use” the song for a few related comments. Continue reading

Calpers, SEC and the Hawthorne Effect on PE

This morning a “must read” Pulse email caught my eye before my finger could enter the “default mode” and hit the delete key on my phone. The word science, spotted in the title, won my curiosity, sneaking in through my Galilean inclination. Continue reading

IRR Alpha Looks Bigger [More Subtly Fooled #1]

When a standard of measurement of returns allows close to 70% of investment managers (GPs) to claim their funds are first quartile performers (i.e. ranked in the top 25%) (1) – such as the case of the IRR – something is obviously wrong. Continue reading

Fair Value, DaRC Transparency

A recent article from the Private Equity Manager’s Daily Digest titled “When is fair value not fair value?” provides interesting and sharable comments about the decision taken by the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) to create a task force and deliver more granular rules for “valuing hard-to-price non-quoted companies”. Continue reading

The Price of Private Funds Is Less Wrong

If Prof. Malkiel had taken his “Random Walkin Midtown Manhattan, the private capital industry’s enclave, he could have found that prices can be “less wrong” there than down Wall Street – to a level that could offer, over the life of a private fund, reasonable arbitrage opportunities but not without risk. Continue reading